Why DAS MATIA?

Why DAS MATIA?

In different societies around the world, women come across different challenges.

As a woman, you might have been through the pain of feeling vulnerable, feeling that you are not enough, running after the validation of your partner, your family, your friends, fearing that if you showed your true and authentic self you would not be accepted and loved.

DAS MATIA decided to make all that is possible and impossible so that fewer and fewer women experience this pain and lack, so that every woman can lead a happy, healthy abundant and meaningful life.


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Image CreditUN Women

Statistics WOMEN & POLITICS

  1. In January 2015, only 17% of government ministers globally were women (Inter-Parliamentary Union, 2015).
  2. Around the world, women are paid less than men, in most countries earning on average 60%-75% of men’s wages (World Bank Gender Data Portal, 2015).
  3. Over a third of women have experienced physical/sexual violence by a partner and/or sexual violence by a non-partner in their lifetime.
  4. An EU survey showed that 34% of women with a health problem or disability had experienced violence by a partner in their lifetime, compared to 19% per cent of women without a health problem or disability (European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, 2014).
  5. According to UN Women, in conflict and post-conflict countries, maternal mortality is on average 2.5 times higher.
  6. Women are more likely than men to work in informal employment. In South Asia, over 80% of women in non-agricultural jobs are in informal employment. In sub-Saharan Africa, the figure is 74%, and in Latin America and the Caribbean, it is 54% (UN Women, 2015).
  7. Of 585 peace agreements from 1990 to 2010, only 92 contained any reference to women (International and Comparative Law Quarterly, 2010).
  8. Women bear disproportionate caring responsibility for children, the elderly and the sick, spending as much as ten times more time a day on unpaid care work than men, according to the World Bank.
  9. Women’s participation increases the probability of peace agreements lasting at least two years by 20%. It also increases the probability of a peace agreement lasting 15 years by 35%, according to UN Women.
  10. Girls who complete primary and secondary education are likely to earn income, have fewer unwanted pregnancies and break the cycle of poverty.

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Image CreditUN Women

Statistics WOMEN, PEACE & SECURITY

  1. Rape has been a widespread and systematic tactic in modern wars. Conservative estimates suggest that 20,000 to 50,000 women were raped during the 1992–1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while between 250,000 and 500,000 women and girls were targeted in the 1994 Rwandan genocide. (UN Women)
  2. Data from 39 countries show that the presence of women police officers correlates positively with reporting of sexual assault. Yet on average, based on 99 countries with available data, women make up only 10 per cent of police forces.  (UN Women)
  3. Around 120 million girls worldwide (slightly more than 1 in 10) have experienced forced intercourse or other forced sexual acts at some point in their lives. By far the most common perpetrators of sexual violence against girls are current or former husbands, partners or boyfriends. (Hidden in Plain Sight: A Statistical Analysis of Violence against Children, p. 167.)
  4. At least 200 million women and girls alive today have undergone female genital mutilation/cutting in 30 countries, according to new estimates published on the United Nations’ International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation in 2016. In most of these countries, the majority of girls were cut before age 5. (Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A global concern)
  5. Adult women account for almost half of all human trafficking victims detected globally. Women and girls together account for about 70 per cent, with girls representing two out of every three child trafficking victims. (Global Report on Trafficking in Persons, p. 5, 11.)
  6. One in 10 women in the European Union report having experienced cyber-harassment since the age of 15 (including having received unwanted, offensive sexually explicit emails or SMS messages, or offensive, inappropriate advances on social networking sites). The risk is highest among young women between 18 and 29 years of age. (Violence against women: an EU-wide survey, p. 104.)

 

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Image CreditUN Women